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4 signs of estate executor misconduct

On Behalf of | Jan 19, 2024 | Probate |

Probate can be a complex process, especially in Washington, where specific rules govern the distribution of assets after someone passes away.

The person responsible for overseeing this process is the estate executor. However, there are instances where misconduct can occur, potentially affecting the rightful beneficiaries.

1. Delayed distribution of assets

One common sign of executor misconduct is the undue delay in distributing the deceased person’s assets. Probate proceedings should move forward efficiently. If beneficiaries notice significant delays without valid explanations, it could indicate foul play.

2. Inconsistent communication

Effective communication is necessary during the probate process. Executors must keep beneficiaries informed about the progress and decisions made. If beneficiaries experience inconsistent or unclear communication, it may be a sign of misconduct. Lack of transparency can lead to misunderstandings and suspicions among the beneficiaries.

3. Unauthorized transactions or asset transfers

Misconduct may manifest through unauthorized financial transactions or asset transfers. Beneficiaries should carefully review financial records and statements to ensure that all actions taken by the executor align with the deceased person’s wishes and comply with Washington State probate laws.

4. Disregard for beneficiaries’ interests

A key responsibility of the executor is to prioritize the interests of the beneficiaries. If beneficiaries observe actions that seem to prioritize the executor’s interests or neglect the rightful beneficiaries, it could be a sign of misconduct.

Although your loved one was one of the 32% of Americans with an estate plan, some aspects of the settlement still require probate. Unfortunately, some assigned executors can draw out the process and take advantage of their position.

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